Pendulum
Jazz isn't dead. It just smells funny.
Pendulum
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belleandwhistle:

breyanarae:


elegantlytasteless:

Underwater sculpture, in Grenada, in honor of our African ancestors thrown overboard.


I couldnt not reblog this, it’s so powerful to me.

oh my god.
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grandi-flora:



Eartha Kitt. Photographed by Gordon Parks. (1952)

More like Eartha Kitten eh, EHHHH???
grandi-flora:



Eartha Kitt. Photographed by Gordon Parks. (1952)

More like Eartha Kitten eh, EHHHH???
grandi-flora:



Eartha Kitt. Photographed by Gordon Parks. (1952)

More like Eartha Kitten eh, EHHHH???
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artlog:


Cajsa von Zeipel’s Androgynous Clique
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artlog:


Cajsa von Zeipel’s Androgynous Clique
Read More
artlog:


Cajsa von Zeipel’s Androgynous Clique
Read More
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iamjapanese:

Mary Sprague(American)
Luber’s Tree   2007  
Gusts Up To Fifty, Morristown, New York   2007   
Near Lotte, Morristown, New York   2007
Point Reyes Trees, Northern California   2008
Spirit Rock Hill, California    2008
pen and ink   via
iamjapanese:

Mary Sprague(American)
Luber’s Tree   2007  
Gusts Up To Fifty, Morristown, New York   2007   
Near Lotte, Morristown, New York   2007
Point Reyes Trees, Northern California   2008
Spirit Rock Hill, California    2008
pen and ink   via
iamjapanese:

Mary Sprague(American)
Luber’s Tree   2007  
Gusts Up To Fifty, Morristown, New York   2007   
Near Lotte, Morristown, New York   2007
Point Reyes Trees, Northern California   2008
Spirit Rock Hill, California    2008
pen and ink   via
iamjapanese:

Mary Sprague(American)
Luber’s Tree   2007  
Gusts Up To Fifty, Morristown, New York   2007   
Near Lotte, Morristown, New York   2007
Point Reyes Trees, Northern California   2008
Spirit Rock Hill, California    2008
pen and ink   via
iamjapanese:

Mary Sprague(American)
Luber’s Tree   2007  
Gusts Up To Fifty, Morristown, New York   2007   
Near Lotte, Morristown, New York   2007
Point Reyes Trees, Northern California   2008
Spirit Rock Hill, California    2008
pen and ink   via
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Teeth
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atthebloodbank:

Untitled | via Tumblr on We Heart It.
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Pink curve along the Spiral Jetty, the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Robert Smithson’s famous earthwork Spiral Jetty is located in the north arm on the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Using black basalt rocks and earth from the site, the artist created a coil 1500 feet long and 15ft wide that stretches out counterclockwise into the translucent red water
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boyirl:

imabirdnowunknown, 2012
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artlog:

The Seaworthy Sculpture of David McQueen
Today, the seas have been charted, the lands all found, and even the moon is only a stone’s throw away.  But David McQueen’s A Once Imagined Ocean, his first solo exhibition at the Kim Foster Gallery running through October 4, reminds us of the wonder that the ocean once held as the frontier of unknown territories. 
On the wall directly facing the gallery entrance, McQueen presents a collection of sea-worthy objects, all crafted in the nostalgic media of etched brass, mahogany and birch, and glass.  They’re not necessarily functional tools, although some closely resemble navigational charts, sextants, or telescopes.  McQueen is obviously a skilled craftsman as well as artist, and the appeal of these pieces lies largely in their tactile, mechanical, weighty resonance.
The show isn’t only a reminder of an earlier time, an earlier mode of transportation, exploration, and commerce.  It’s also a dreamy, imaginative exploration of the wonder that the sea can still hold.  
 
David McQueen, Breaching Pod, laminated birch and plywood, 36 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen.  Photo by Aaron Mayper
In Breaching Pod, thin planks of birch and plywood bulge from a smooth plane to form the hulls and keels of three small boats, or perhaps the backs and dorsal fins of a couple of dolphins or whales.   
 
David McQueen, Balikbayan Boat, basswood and brass, 78x96x9 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo courtesy Kim Foster Gallery.

David McQueen, The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will, wood, plaster, fiberglass, steel, 6x6x10 ft. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo by Aaron Mayper.
This ambiguity of vessel-or-creature is central to many of McQueen’s works.  In Balikbayan Boat, a basswood and brass piece, a canoe-like boat warps, stretches, and twists until it becomes almost eel-like.  And The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will features a group of miniature row boats, circling round and round like a school of fish.
These pieces are like the daydreams of a ship’s captain, where his own vessel takes on the shifting qualities of the creatures that swim beneath him. 
A Once Imagined Ocean is on display at the Kim Foster Gallery, 529 W. 20th st., through October 4.
All photos courtesy kimfostergallery.com unless otherwise noted.
-Aaron Mayper
artlog:

The Seaworthy Sculpture of David McQueen
Today, the seas have been charted, the lands all found, and even the moon is only a stone’s throw away.  But David McQueen’s A Once Imagined Ocean, his first solo exhibition at the Kim Foster Gallery running through October 4, reminds us of the wonder that the ocean once held as the frontier of unknown territories. 
On the wall directly facing the gallery entrance, McQueen presents a collection of sea-worthy objects, all crafted in the nostalgic media of etched brass, mahogany and birch, and glass.  They’re not necessarily functional tools, although some closely resemble navigational charts, sextants, or telescopes.  McQueen is obviously a skilled craftsman as well as artist, and the appeal of these pieces lies largely in their tactile, mechanical, weighty resonance.
The show isn’t only a reminder of an earlier time, an earlier mode of transportation, exploration, and commerce.  It’s also a dreamy, imaginative exploration of the wonder that the sea can still hold.  
 
David McQueen, Breaching Pod, laminated birch and plywood, 36 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen.  Photo by Aaron Mayper
In Breaching Pod, thin planks of birch and plywood bulge from a smooth plane to form the hulls and keels of three small boats, or perhaps the backs and dorsal fins of a couple of dolphins or whales.   
 
David McQueen, Balikbayan Boat, basswood and brass, 78x96x9 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo courtesy Kim Foster Gallery.

David McQueen, The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will, wood, plaster, fiberglass, steel, 6x6x10 ft. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo by Aaron Mayper.
This ambiguity of vessel-or-creature is central to many of McQueen’s works.  In Balikbayan Boat, a basswood and brass piece, a canoe-like boat warps, stretches, and twists until it becomes almost eel-like.  And The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will features a group of miniature row boats, circling round and round like a school of fish.
These pieces are like the daydreams of a ship’s captain, where his own vessel takes on the shifting qualities of the creatures that swim beneath him. 
A Once Imagined Ocean is on display at the Kim Foster Gallery, 529 W. 20th st., through October 4.
All photos courtesy kimfostergallery.com unless otherwise noted.
-Aaron Mayper
artlog:

The Seaworthy Sculpture of David McQueen
Today, the seas have been charted, the lands all found, and even the moon is only a stone’s throw away.  But David McQueen’s A Once Imagined Ocean, his first solo exhibition at the Kim Foster Gallery running through October 4, reminds us of the wonder that the ocean once held as the frontier of unknown territories. 
On the wall directly facing the gallery entrance, McQueen presents a collection of sea-worthy objects, all crafted in the nostalgic media of etched brass, mahogany and birch, and glass.  They’re not necessarily functional tools, although some closely resemble navigational charts, sextants, or telescopes.  McQueen is obviously a skilled craftsman as well as artist, and the appeal of these pieces lies largely in their tactile, mechanical, weighty resonance.
The show isn’t only a reminder of an earlier time, an earlier mode of transportation, exploration, and commerce.  It’s also a dreamy, imaginative exploration of the wonder that the sea can still hold.  
 
David McQueen, Breaching Pod, laminated birch and plywood, 36 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen.  Photo by Aaron Mayper
In Breaching Pod, thin planks of birch and plywood bulge from a smooth plane to form the hulls and keels of three small boats, or perhaps the backs and dorsal fins of a couple of dolphins or whales.   
 
David McQueen, Balikbayan Boat, basswood and brass, 78x96x9 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo courtesy Kim Foster Gallery.

David McQueen, The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will, wood, plaster, fiberglass, steel, 6x6x10 ft. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo by Aaron Mayper.
This ambiguity of vessel-or-creature is central to many of McQueen’s works.  In Balikbayan Boat, a basswood and brass piece, a canoe-like boat warps, stretches, and twists until it becomes almost eel-like.  And The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will features a group of miniature row boats, circling round and round like a school of fish.
These pieces are like the daydreams of a ship’s captain, where his own vessel takes on the shifting qualities of the creatures that swim beneath him. 
A Once Imagined Ocean is on display at the Kim Foster Gallery, 529 W. 20th st., through October 4.
All photos courtesy kimfostergallery.com unless otherwise noted.
-Aaron Mayper
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selbstparadies:

By Henrietta Harris
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I feel like a Marilyn today
I feel like a Marilyn today
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I got to hang out with Chris and Oliver Wood. Chris signed my bass and Oliver gave me craisins.
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