Pendulum
Jazz isn't dead. It just smells funny.
Pendulum
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abstract-media:

http://secophoto.tumblr.com/
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oupacademic:


There were several important records released in 1959, but no event or recording matches the importance of the release of the new Miles Davis album Kind of Blue on 17 August 1959. There were people waiting in line at record stores to buy it on the day it appeared. It sold very well from its first day, and it has sold increasingly well ever since. It is the best-selling jazz album in the Columbia Records catalogue, and at the end of the twentieth century it was voted one of the ten best albums ever produced.

Jeremy Yudkin writes about the classic album over on the OUPblog. Above, you find his bibliography and a great selection of books about the great American jazz musician. 
Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis.  Reprint: 2 vols. in one. New York: Da Capo, 1998.
Davis, Miles with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.
Gridley, Mark. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 7th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.
Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
Yudkin, Jeremy. Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Birth of Postbop. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2007.
oupacademic:


There were several important records released in 1959, but no event or recording matches the importance of the release of the new Miles Davis album Kind of Blue on 17 August 1959. There were people waiting in line at record stores to buy it on the day it appeared. It sold very well from its first day, and it has sold increasingly well ever since. It is the best-selling jazz album in the Columbia Records catalogue, and at the end of the twentieth century it was voted one of the ten best albums ever produced.

Jeremy Yudkin writes about the classic album over on the OUPblog. Above, you find his bibliography and a great selection of books about the great American jazz musician. 
Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis.  Reprint: 2 vols. in one. New York: Da Capo, 1998.
Davis, Miles with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.
Gridley, Mark. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 7th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.
Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
Yudkin, Jeremy. Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Birth of Postbop. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2007.
oupacademic:


There were several important records released in 1959, but no event or recording matches the importance of the release of the new Miles Davis album Kind of Blue on 17 August 1959. There were people waiting in line at record stores to buy it on the day it appeared. It sold very well from its first day, and it has sold increasingly well ever since. It is the best-selling jazz album in the Columbia Records catalogue, and at the end of the twentieth century it was voted one of the ten best albums ever produced.

Jeremy Yudkin writes about the classic album over on the OUPblog. Above, you find his bibliography and a great selection of books about the great American jazz musician. 
Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis.  Reprint: 2 vols. in one. New York: Da Capo, 1998.
Davis, Miles with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.
Gridley, Mark. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 7th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.
Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
Yudkin, Jeremy. Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Birth of Postbop. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2007.
oupacademic:


There were several important records released in 1959, but no event or recording matches the importance of the release of the new Miles Davis album Kind of Blue on 17 August 1959. There were people waiting in line at record stores to buy it on the day it appeared. It sold very well from its first day, and it has sold increasingly well ever since. It is the best-selling jazz album in the Columbia Records catalogue, and at the end of the twentieth century it was voted one of the ten best albums ever produced.

Jeremy Yudkin writes about the classic album over on the OUPblog. Above, you find his bibliography and a great selection of books about the great American jazz musician. 
Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis.  Reprint: 2 vols. in one. New York: Da Capo, 1998.
Davis, Miles with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.
Gridley, Mark. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 7th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.
Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
Yudkin, Jeremy. Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Birth of Postbop. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2007.
oupacademic:


There were several important records released in 1959, but no event or recording matches the importance of the release of the new Miles Davis album Kind of Blue on 17 August 1959. There were people waiting in line at record stores to buy it on the day it appeared. It sold very well from its first day, and it has sold increasingly well ever since. It is the best-selling jazz album in the Columbia Records catalogue, and at the end of the twentieth century it was voted one of the ten best albums ever produced.

Jeremy Yudkin writes about the classic album over on the OUPblog. Above, you find his bibliography and a great selection of books about the great American jazz musician. 
Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis.  Reprint: 2 vols. in one. New York: Da Capo, 1998.
Davis, Miles with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.
Gridley, Mark. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 7th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.
Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
Yudkin, Jeremy. Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Birth of Postbop. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2007.
oupacademic:


There were several important records released in 1959, but no event or recording matches the importance of the release of the new Miles Davis album Kind of Blue on 17 August 1959. There were people waiting in line at record stores to buy it on the day it appeared. It sold very well from its first day, and it has sold increasingly well ever since. It is the best-selling jazz album in the Columbia Records catalogue, and at the end of the twentieth century it was voted one of the ten best albums ever produced.

Jeremy Yudkin writes about the classic album over on the OUPblog. Above, you find his bibliography and a great selection of books about the great American jazz musician. 
Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis.  Reprint: 2 vols. in one. New York: Da Capo, 1998.
Davis, Miles with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.
Gridley, Mark. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 7th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.
Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
Yudkin, Jeremy. Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Birth of Postbop. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2007.
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modernlove20:

Herbert Bayer
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4sen:

Christian Beirle González
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visual-poetry:

»white noise« by bethany collins

chalk and charcoal on chalkboard
visual-poetry:

»white noise« by bethany collins

chalk and charcoal on chalkboard
visual-poetry:

»white noise« by bethany collins

chalk and charcoal on chalkboard
visual-poetry:

»white noise« by bethany collins

chalk and charcoal on chalkboard
visual-poetry:

»white noise« by bethany collins

chalk and charcoal on chalkboard
visual-poetry:

»white noise« by bethany collins

chalk and charcoal on chalkboard
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pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 
pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 
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aotsukii:

If Dali tale me: future inner
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likeafieldmouse:

Pyotr Belenok - Over the Ocean (1973) 
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tylerspangler:

Tyler Spangler Graphic Design
BUY PRINTS - www.society6.com/tylerspangler
www.tylerspangler.com
www.instagram.com/tyler_spangler
www.facebook.com/tylerspangler1985
tylerclintonspangler@hotmail.com
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wzu:

Venus, the sun, and an airplane.
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deletingmyself:

Birds of a Different Feather (by Allison Farrand)| Moustier-Sainte-Marie, France
500px | Facebook | Prints
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behardfreebop:

Thelonious Monk.
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erishasha:

Nicola Samori
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